Thursday, May 24, 2018

Hurriedly to illegality

One tries to take a couple days off for a "procedure" and one comes back to yet a new spectacle of the absurd.


Today Maduro was sworn in, but he was not.  Let's face it: the 1999 constitution is crystal clear that an elected president is sworn on January 10. There is no doubt on that.

There is no doubt that the 1999 constitution is still the legal one since the constituent assembly, ANC, has yet to discuss anything substantial (or unsubstantial for that matter) on a new constitution.

Never mind that the ANC has been called and elected illegally and thus the anticipated presidential election called by the ANC is void. Never mind the extent of cheating the regime may have done without even reaching 46% participation (only some "experts" claim that 40% was reached).

Let's just say to simplify arguments that Maduro today swore that he will be swearing in on January. Or something of that likeness.

So why call for a show in a hurry, a swearing in that defies any logical time, a swearing in that is not attended by any foreign figure that I know off, even allied. These last ones simply did not have time to come to the hurried up event, and Maduro needs them for such a show!

This is a slap in the face to the bulk of nations that have announced they will not recognize him. This is a slap in the face of the opposition that voted earlier at the national assembly that the election was void.

More importantly this is a slap in the face to the "dissidence" inside chavismo. They all know that Maduro did not get 6 million votes IN SPITE of all the electoral cheating he and his cronies perpetrated. The Maduro clan looks more and more isolated within chavismo, albeit more powerful. This week numerous arrest in military barracks happened. they have been happening regularly which means that indeed some discontent exist there. Why should it not be so? The troops is as deprived of adequate food as the rest of the populace. Only generals and colonels are fat, obscenely fat sometimes. And not all of them must be willing to sacrifice their reaches as international sanctions are widening, taking last round the #2 of the regime AND his family in a swell scoop.

But there may be a side effect to that hurried swearing ceremony, not that Maduro cares for those at this point. By swearing in that he will swear in but in fact starting as of today his new term, he does so outside of the law and current constitution. As such he allows any country that wishes it not to recognize any document that carries his signature.

As of today.

That simple.



4 comments:

  1. Well said: ' By swearing in that he will swear in but in fact starting as of today his new term, he does so outside of the law and current constitution. As such he allows any country that wishes it not to recognize any document that carries his signature.'

    ReplyDelete
  2. Including even Chavez has the government not been operating outside the constitution. In Chavez re election bid did he not use gov't coffers to promote his re-election. Hasn't most everything they have done been outside the constitution. Why would the world need any more illegal activity to not recognize the regime and recognize the properly elected NA and exiled judges as the rightful rulers of Venezuela.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Your article has proven useful to me. It’s very informative and you are obviously very knowledgeable in this area. You have opened my eyes to varying views on this topic with interesting and solid content.

    English news
    Breaking news
    Latest news
    Update news
    World news
    http://www.onlineindus.com/

    ReplyDelete
  4. Boludo Tejano2:57 PM

    There is no doubt that the 1999 constitution is still the legal one since the constituent assembly, ANC, has yet to discuss anything substantial (or unsubstantial for that matter) on a new constitution.

    Yet the party line was that Venezuela needed a new Constitution to replace the Chavista-written 1999 Consitution that El Finado once described as "perfect."

    But not a thing done on writing a new Constitution. Writing it should be rather easy: "Chavistas, anything you do to remain in power, or to acquire more power, is legal."

    ReplyDelete

Comments policy:

1) Comments are moderated after the fourth day of publication. It may take up to a day or two for your note to appear then.

2) Your post will appear if you follow the basic rules. I will be ruthless in erasing, as well as those who replied to any off rule comment.

3) COMMENT RULES:
Do not be repetitive.
Do not bring grudges and fights from other blogs here (this is the strictest rule).
This is an anti Chavez/chavismo blog, Readers have made up their minds long ago. Trying to prove us wrong is considered a troll. Still, you are welcome as a chavista to post if you want to explain us coherently as to why chavismo does this or that. We are still waiting for that to happen.
Insults and put downs are frowned upon and I will be sole judge on whether to publish them.

Followers