Tuesday, November 30, 2010

It is raining, a lot.....

We are starting to face an emergency.  Not as bad by far as the one in 1999, but impressive nevertheless. 

The difference with 1999 is that it might be raining more, significantly more in some areas, than in 1999, but the rain is somewhat more even, more like a continuous never ending strong drizzle to outright rain but no real monsoon as 1999 was at times.  Here in San Felipe it has been raining at least 8 hours a day since last Saturday when I came back from a local trip (it was raining already when I was away, everyday, for several hours).  Last night it started raining at 6 PM and never let go until dawn.  I had to wait for a slight lull to walk the dog and we still managed to get both wet.  Tonight it has started again at around 8 PM.  But that is at home, in Caracas it has been pouring and elsewhere in Yaracuy rains were strong enough that the highway between San Felipe and Barquisimeto is closed as a bridge went down.  Today I saw some old trees down with the weight of the water!

Miranda Governor, Capriles Radonski, on the disaster sites.
Of course the regime has been caught again unprepared.  And pissed off at being caught once again they find nothing else to do but to rob a relief convoy to Falcon state, North of here, where the damage has been the worst so far.  The convoy of food and clothes was organized by opposition charities cordianted by Leopoldo Lopez of Voluntad Popular, imagine that!!!  But of course we all know that only the bolibanana revolution is allowed to have solidarity thoughts.  It is a disgrace to watch how the regime is trying to turn this into a political contest with outright lies.

Unfortunately the pictures of hands down, and wet pants, are with opposition governors, Elias Jaua, the infamous vice president, seems to be quite dry as he attacks the opposition.  A new low...........

6 comments:

  1. Anonymous2:26 AM

    Not so long ago the electricity problems were blamed on a lack of water in the hydro system.

    Now the problems will explained away by to much water.

    Once you get the hang of it its simple.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Anonymous10:08 AM

    After that photo of Governor Radonski up to his waist in flood water, Chavez must be livid. I hope Chavez poses for a photo with flood water over his head.

    Chavez will stay dry in his ultra-luxurious palace while telling Venezuelans how much he cares for them.

    ReplyDelete
  3. second anonymous

    it seems that indeed chavismo is upset. and yet they have the governor of falcon whose enhanced physical attributes should help her float, plus wet tee effect.

    since she cannot damage her hairdo that explains probably why they sent there al-alzeimer to salvage the day, not for the locals under water but for huguito

    ReplyDelete
  4. george5:57 PM

    i see the president is allowing the people to move into the government buildings. My question is if they will follow their own rules when it comes time for the families to leave. By law, you can kick someone out and many landlords will not rent to couples with babies or small children because they cant evict them.

    will the government use their own rules???? naa

    ReplyDelete
  5. Good grief! How can anyone still deny the saintly compassion of el Presidente? He has, in characteristically humble benignity, opened Miraflores palace to twenty-five families displaced by the floods! Not only that, but "following their president's lead, National Assembly officials said space in parliament could also be temporarily used as a refuge for victims of the rains chaos. . . . Supporters praise Chavez as the first leader in Venezuela to care for the poor." Such leadership! Even the National Assembly is following.

    Such unprecedented kindness! I feel a leg tingle coming on. Gasp.

    Actually, it is a far better use for Miraflores Palace than any to which Chavez had previously put it.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Roger9:10 PM

    I'm sure the only question Fearless Leader had was " will this effect oil production". What is important here is that this effects Venezuelans directly and a lack of response will have serious results.

    ReplyDelete

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