Friday, December 05, 2008

With revolutionary students like these who needs conservative old farts?

Tal Cual brings us today one of these precious revolutionary moments that put a smile on our faces for at least a nice week end.

One of the chavista student leaders, Robert Serra, has announced without flinching that the amendment to reelect Chavez was good for the opposition since it needed to have Chavez in power to make sure that the poor 80% of the Venezuelan masses would not riot and take away all of their due from the rich.

Yes, you read it right.

To make sure that there is no confusion I am putting below the original Spanish words of Serra, according to Tal Cual:

Es el liderazgo del presidente Chávez el único muro de contención para que ese 80% de excluidos no se enfrente por otra vía a ese otro 20% de acomodados, de incluidos, de incorporados o que sí estuvieron en la repartición de las piñatas que se entregaban en este país.
This is just so wonderful, so rich, that one does not know where to start. So I pick at random the condition of Serra. Serra is an appointed student leader. All chavista "student leaders" are appointed, or something equivalent but we never see elections such as the ones that elect the opposition student leaders. I am not saying this to besmirch Serra, he is entitled to his opinions and to a fat check form Chavez if he can get it. But it is important to note this because Serra does not speak for the chavista students, he speaks for the regime. I am pretty sure that the chavista students are much more revolutionary than Serra, if you ask me.

A second thing I could harp on is the numerology of Serra. Surely he has not read the same election results that we did because if indeed 80% of Venezuelan people are dirt poor to the point of being ready to go and pillage the other 20%, then how come the opposition now is above 40%? You can forgive this type of speech from your average political hack, but Serra also points out in his declaration that day that he is a lawyer from the UCAB, which is allegedly the best law school of Venezuela. And a private school at that so he does not come from the 80% downtrodden masses that can barely afford public elementary school. Besides, if after 10 years of chavismo there are still 80% poor, then what is the use of keeping Chavez?

I will spare the reader discussing on the poor legal judgement Serra emits. But I will not spare you from discussing the challenge to debate opposition student leaders on the amendment. That ship has sailed Robert! Not only the opposition student leader debated enough to help sink the 2007 "reforma" but some of them run for election and some whee elected. They are way past wasting time with you. By the way, I have not heard much about chavista student leaders running for office two weeks ago. In fact, one of the noted ones is currently working at Miraflores. Can we debate him?

Poor Robert, he has become a Conservative old fart and nobody is around to point that to him.


-The end-

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